Superused home

Superused home

//////POST UNDER CONSTRUCTION/////////

After a long restoration, we are proud to present the end result of Superuse co-founder Césare Peeren’s home. A beautiful example of how our cities could evolve, re-using pre-existing housing and local material flows. Starting from the ’90s, thanks to cooperation between the municipality and private owner, the street’s new inhabitants managed to save the whole housing complex. Césare’s house has resulted in an organic assembling of elements and materials from other Superuse ‘s projects realized during the following two decades, implementing flows of re-used materials into the renovation process.

While this portfolio includes a small selection of photographs, you might want to see the extended preview ; the link is also at the end of the page.

The whole housing complex along the east side of the Gerald Scholtenstraat in Rotterdam’s northern part resume today three decades of community efforts. Where inhabitants joined forces to save the heritage value of the street.

The communal approach is also expressed in the collaboration between Césare and his neighbor Hugo; a master of crafts in building and interiors who has been an essential ingredient to complete the restoration, sharing both efforts, knowledge, and investments.

↑ Above image slider: Césare Peeren and Hugo Lammerink during the finishing of the garden’s facade.

“It is made with the waste of the waste of the waste,”

Quote from the interview with Césare Peeren, June 2019.

For example, the garden’s facade’s insulation has been realized upcycling Trespa plates leftover from the other two projects. Initially, the gray panels were office desks dismantled from a bank in Rotterdam around 2009. The material was mainly upcycled on the DortYart project.

DortYart Art Center | Dordrecht NL | Design by Superuse Photo © Denis Guzzo

Superused home’s exterior views

It was 2012 while Rem Koolhaas’s Vertical City was being completed at the Maas river’s waterfront in Rotterdam; I have started the documentation of one of the most surprising designs I have ever seen in public space so far. Designed by Superuse, the ReWind urban bench at Willemsplein recalls a beautiful statement: “think big act small.” The object consists of reused discarded-windmills’ blades while the concrete blocks are made of 90% of recycled concrete material from local demolitions.

Above: the street view of the house. 

Respecting the historical aesthetics, the house has been maintained in its original look at the street side, while it has been reinterpreted at the garden’s side.

With the same approach, the roof has been regenerated by re-using the old shingles to revive a new roof and composing the house’s number ’98’ in its front part.

To complete the rest of the surface, Césare used dead-stock insulating panels which creates a patchwork of colors. Some of them are semi-transparent to increase the amount of light coming into the attic floor.

Below Image Slider: Superused home during the spring of 2020 | © Denis Guzzo

↑↓ Selected vertical views of the garden’s side off the Superused home  © Denis Guzzo 2020 ↑↓

# GROUND FLOOR

Above: selected vertical views.
Below Image Slider: ground floor of the Superused Home.

Above Image Slider: ground floor of the Superused Home during nocturnal good vibes.

# FIRST FLOOR

Above Image Slider: the first floor of the Superused Home.

Below: selected night view.


# SECOND FLOOR

LOW-TECH 

LIGHT SOLUTIONS

A shatterproof glass-window repurposed as an integral part of the laundry room: definitely the scariest and fascinating detail of the house. It allows most of the light gained by the upper window to illuminate the lower floors, with a focus on the office’s table on the first floor.

THE RED ROOM

# THIRD FLOOR

..work in progress:
stay tuned!

  • 97 % RENEWABLE ENERGY 97% 97%

 

Combining older-generation solar pannels with new ones; energy is harvested from both the roof and the balcony installations.

RAIN WATER

COLLECTION

Rain water is a precious resourse in terms of food production and house holding. The house is provided with three collecting silos at different floors. 

ReWind LGBTQI+ Monument

ReWind LGBTQI+ Monument

Watch the short documentary and discover how the synergy of various professionals and organizations created this amazing intervention of place-making.

“I think it’s an interesting way of thinking, too, for municipalities, to look at: “what do we actually have?” ..and every time we think: “We want the square differently”.. We could also think: “Can we do that with the ingredients that are already there?”

From the interview with Césare Peeren, ReWind LGBTQI+ Monument short documentary, June 2020.

ReWind LGBTQI+ Monument

A 12 minutes short documentary written, filmed, and edited by Denis Guzzo.

With: Monique Marijnissen, Césare Peeren, David Louf, Marjolijn van der Meijden, Talitha Nöllen and Gert-Jan Verboom as representatives of the LHBTI community of Rotterdam.

Languages: Dutch spoken | English subtitles | Commissioned by: Centre for Visual Arts (CBK) Rotterdam | Art & public space, Marjolijn van der Meijden www.bkor.nl | In cooperation with: initiators LGBTI monument for sexual- en gender diversity Rotterdam, Talitha Nöllen, Gert-Jan Verboom | ReWind LGBTIQ place-making: commissioned by Municipality of Rotterdam | Monique Marijnissen | Design ReWind: Superuse | Césare Peeren | Painting ReWind: David Louf / Mr June | Soundtracks: HUMAN – Sevdaliza Courtesy of MAKTUB & Full Crate | Japanese Suvenir by DeKibo, Premium beat | Subtitles translation: Tirsa With.

Follow a full photo reportage that display ‘before’, ‘during’ and ‘after’ the process of  place-making

It was 2012 while Rem Koolhaas’s Vertical City was being completed at the Maas river’s waterfront in Rotterdam; I have started the documentation of one of the most surprising designs I have ever seen in public space so far. Designed by Superuse, the ReWind urban bench at Willemsplein recalls a beautiful statement: “think big act small.” The object consists of reused discarded-windmills’ blades while the concrete blocks are made of 90% of recycled concrete material from local demolitions.

Above & below: the aerial views of ReWind at Willemsplein, Rotterdam ©  Denis Guzzo | 2012

Explore the complete series from 2012 on the postRE-USE.EU/BLADE MADE

While wind power has developed rapidly over the past years, many first-generation wind turbines’ economic life cycle is coming to an end. The latest research shows that, by 2050, we will face around 43 million tonnes of wind-turbine blade material waste worldwide.

On June 3rd, 2020, the blade-made object ReWind was placed back on Willemsplein, Rotterdam, with a strikingly colorful new look. Graphic designer and street painter David Louf a.k.a. Mr. June, made the design in collaboration with the Rotterdam group from the LGBTQI+ community and with the designer of ReWind, architect Césare Peeren.

RePainting ReWind by Mr June

Since 1985, David Louf has been operating under Mr. June’s name as an artist, street artist, graphic designer. At the age of 14, he was part of the hip-hop movement and performed as a breakdancer. After his studies at the Utrecht School of the Arts, he quickly named himself a graphic designer.

The street’s freedom turned out to be more attractive, and he has been one of the most famous street artists for quite some time. Worldwide he has provided buildings, floors, and facades with optical patterns. Via Césare Peeren, architect at Superuse Mr. June was introduced to the group of Rotterdammers from the LGBTQI + community, the monument’s initiators to sexual and gender diversity.

Above Image Slider: Mr.June painting ReWind inside the barn of a farm in the countryside of Rotterdam © Denis Guzzo 2020

ReWind installation

Above Image Slider: selected horizontal photos from the installation series.

Below: two selected photos from the installation series.

ReWind LGBTQI+ Monument

Above single image: vertical view of the newly installed ReWind | © Denis Guzzo 2020

Above Image Slider: selected vertical views of the newly installed ReWind | © Denis Guzzo 2020

Above Image Slider: selected horizontal views of the newly installed ReWind | © Denis Guzzo 2020

Learn more about the art and science of building with rotor blades

The post Blade Made shares the same title with the brochure created by Superuse regarding their projects realized by reusing discarded windmills blades.

The post includes an extended photo series and represents a compelling example of how we can transform our cities by reutilizing these extraordinary structural objects.

Print Your City

Print Your City

Print Your City! 3D printing in the circular city

Duration: 4 minutes | Language: English
The New Raw launch Print Your City!  which explores the concept of applying 3D printing to plastic waste, as a way to re-design urban space. As the name suggests, Print your City! is a call for action, rallying citizens to recycle household plastic waste in order to transform it into raw material for public furniture, via a 3D printing process. See the video campaign with an interview with the founders of The New Raw.