Reuse is common sense: FCRBE campaign

Reuse is common sense: FCRBE campaign

Source text and video courtesy of:

FCRBE : https://www.nweurope.eu/fcrbe Interreg : https://www.interregeurope.eu/ 

Reuse of building elements: will it soon be the norm in Europe?

Today in NW-Europe, only 1% of building elements are reused following their first application. Although a large number of elements are technically reusable, they end up being recycled by crushing or melting, or disposed. The result is a high environmental impact and a net loss of economic value. 

This project aims to increase by +50% the amount of reclaimed building elements being circulated on its territory by 2032.

Focusing on the northern half of France, Belgium, and the UK, the project also covers, with lesser intensity, the Netherlands, Ireland, the rest of France, and Luxembourg. This area houses thousands of SMEs specialized in the reclamation and supply of reusable building elements. Despite their obvious potential for the circular economy, these operators face significant challenges: visibility, access to meaningful projects and integration in contemporary building practices. Today, the flow of recirculated goods stagnate and may even decrease due to a lack of structured efforts.

To respond appropriately to these challenges, the project sets up an international partnership involving specialised organisations, trade associations, research centres, an architecture school and public administrations. It is rooted in earlier initiatives that were successfully initiated, on a local level.

These tools will be tested and promoted through 36 pilot operations taking place in large (de)construction projects, whereby more than 360 tons of elements will be reused. Effective communication efforts towards the stakeholders of the construction industry (including public authorities) will facilitate a smooth integration of these outputs into field practices and policies.

 

Source text and video courtesy of:

FCRBE : https://www.nweurope.eu/fcrbe | Interreg : https://www.interregeurope.eu/ 

ReWind LGBTQI+ Monument

ReWind LGBTQI+ Monument

Watch the short documentary and discover how the synergy of various professionals and organizations created this amazing intervention of place-making.

“I think it’s an interesting way of thinking, too, for municipalities, to look at: “what do we actually have?” ..and every time we think: “We want the square differently”.. We could also think: “Can we do that with the ingredients that are already there?”

From the interview with Césare Peeren, ReWind LGBTQI+ Monument short documentary, June 2020.

ReWind LGBTQI+ Monument

A 12 minutes short documentary written, filmed, and edited by Denis Guzzo.

With: Monique Marijnissen, Césare Peeren, David Louf, Marjolijn van der Meijden, Talitha Nöllen and Gert-Jan Verboom as representatives of the LHBTI community of Rotterdam.

Languages: Dutch spoken | English subtitles | Commissioned by: Centre for Visual Arts (CBK) Rotterdam | Art & public space, Marjolijn van der Meijden www.bkor.nl | In cooperation with: initiators LGBTI monument for sexual- en gender diversity Rotterdam, Talitha Nöllen, Gert-Jan Verboom | ReWind LGBTIQ place-making: commissioned by Municipality of Rotterdam | Monique Marijnissen | Design ReWind: Superuse | Césare Peeren | Painting ReWind: David Louf / Mr June | Soundtracks: HUMAN – Sevdaliza Courtesy of MAKTUB & Full Crate | Japanese Suvenir by DeKibo, Premium beat | Subtitles translation: Tirsa With.

Follow a full photo reportage that display ‘before’, ‘during’ and ‘after’ the process of  place-making

It was 2012 while Rem Koolhaas’s Vertical City was being completed at the Maas river’s waterfront in Rotterdam; I have started the documentation of one of the most surprising designs I have ever seen in public space so far. Designed by Superuse, the ReWind urban bench at Willemsplein recalls a beautiful statement: “think big act small.” The object consists of reused discarded-windmills’ blades while the concrete blocks are made of 90% of recycled concrete material from local demolitions.

Above & below: the aerial views of ReWind at Willemsplein, Rotterdam ©  Denis Guzzo | 2012

Explore the complete series from 2012 on the postRE-USE.EU/BLADE MADE

While wind power has developed rapidly over the past years, many first-generation wind turbines’ economic life cycle is coming to an end. The latest research shows that, by 2050, we will face around 43 million tonnes of wind-turbine blade material waste worldwide.

On June 3rd, 2020, the blade-made object ReWind was placed back on Willemsplein, Rotterdam, with a strikingly colorful new look. Graphic designer and street painter David Louf a.k.a. Mr. June, made the design in collaboration with the Rotterdam group from the LGBTQI+ community and with the designer of ReWind, architect Césare Peeren.

RePainting ReWind by Mr June

Since 1985, David Louf has been operating under Mr. June’s name as an artist, street artist, graphic designer. At the age of 14, he was part of the hip-hop movement and performed as a breakdancer. After his studies at the Utrecht School of the Arts, he quickly named himself a graphic designer.

The street’s freedom turned out to be more attractive, and he has been one of the most famous street artists for quite some time. Worldwide he has provided buildings, floors, and facades with optical patterns. Via Césare Peeren, architect at Superuse Mr. June was introduced to the group of Rotterdammers from the LGBTQI + community, the monument’s initiators to sexual and gender diversity.

Above Image Slider: Mr.June painting ReWind inside the barn of a farm in the countryside of Rotterdam © Denis Guzzo 2020

ReWind installation

Above Image Slider: selected horizontal photos from the installation series.

Below: two selected photos from the installation series.

ReWind LGBTQI+ Monument

Above single image: vertical view of the newly installed ReWind | © Denis Guzzo 2020

Above Image Slider: selected vertical views of the newly installed ReWind | © Denis Guzzo 2020

Above Image Slider: selected horizontal views of the newly installed ReWind | © Denis Guzzo 2020

Explore about the art and  science about building with rotor blades

The post Blade Made shares the same title with the brochure created by Superuse regarding their projects realized by reusing discarded windmills blades.

The post includes an extended photo series and represents a compelling example of how we can transform our cities by reutilizing these extraordinary structural objects.

Zero Waste Building

Zero Waste Building

COSTRUIRE A ZERO RIFIUTI

Duration: 10 minutes | Languages: Italian spoken with English subtitles

 

The short documentary ‘Zero-waste building’ quotes the title of the book published in 2016 by the protagonist Paola Altamura, Ph.D. architect at “Sapienza” the University of Rome, co-founder of the Atlante Inerti Project.

 

The documentary gives a broad overview of regulatory limitations and some examples of the potential for reuse in the industrial and design fields.

The interview was filmed within a context that sees the author involved within the European network to expand the Harvest Map in the area around Milan.

Thanks to the commitment of companies, institutions, and the synergy of Italian researchers and designers, we can bring to the public and the political world issues and examples of virtuous projects that allow us to continue the discussion on reuse and related regulations.

‘Superuse’ is cited as a term that identifies the long path of research and experimentation carried out by Superuse: the well-known Rotterdam studio: pioneers who have contributed to changing the perception of ‘waste’ for more than twenty years into ‘resource.’

Harvest Map Milan Expansion

Harvest Map Milan Expansion

Now online the video report about the expansion of the Harvest Map in the area of Milan, Italy.

Related to the project Villa Maggiore ;  this documentation display the workshop given by Dutch pioneer architect Césare Peeren, Superuse on Site: according to the SuperUse philosophy WASTE SHOULD NOT EXIST.

The harvest map is a powerful tool that can help architects and designers to create an urban environment with a circular economy. You can see us running on espressos to catch the Italian waste created by local industries so it can be superused from now on! thanks to Stimuleringsfonds Creatieve Industrie NL, Elisa Saturno, Politecnico di Milano, Giacimenti Urbani, Tempo Riuso, and the harvest team.

An Italian villa is used as a teaching ground by Dutch waste architects to spread circular design tools, methods, and thinking to Italian designers, architects, contractors, and industry.

The project culminated in waste materials from industries around Milan being up-cycled to design furniture for the 450m2 interior fit-out which was designed and built on-site in 4 weeks in ‘Furniture Jam Sessions’ with 14 international waste designers.

Thought by Superuse on site, Césare Peeren | With Refunc, CRO2O, Studio CIFRA, and many others.

Find out more on the post →

Rabo Bank by Refunc

Rabo Bank by Refunc

Rabo Bank by Refunc

In their history, archives have gone through considerable changes, facing numerous challenges along the way. These changes have affected archival science and practice alike. here changes and new challenges can still be experienced today, and their impact now seems even stronger than ever before. Watch here a short video composed of stop motions and time-lapse during the reconstructing of the Rabobank interior based in Maarssen, Utrecht, NL. The project is about reusing old office materials from the bank and designing the interior by giving them a new function and contemporary aesthetics.

Materials:

→ 500 Safe doors
→ 300 value cassettes
→ 400 safe locks
→ 200 archive shelves

Interior concept: Elske Blomme-d´Ancona

Design: Jan Korbes, Denis Oudendijk, Damian van der Velden, Bart Groenewegen and Elske Blomme-d´Ancona.

Video: courtesy of Julius Klimas / Refunc

Source: → Refunc.nl

Print Your City

Print Your City

Print Your City! 3D printing in the circular city

Duration: 4 minutes | Language: English
The New Raw launch Print Your City!  which explores the concept of applying 3D printing to plastic waste, as a way to re-design urban space. As the name suggests, Print your City! is a call for action, rallying citizens to recycle household plastic waste in order to transform it into raw material for public furniture, via a 3D printing process. See the video campaign with an interview with the founders of The New Raw.